Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder: review of systematic reviews.

Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder: review of systematic reviews.

This study aims to summarise the evidence on more than 140 pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for major depressive disorder (MDD) and to evaluate the confidence that patients and clinicians can have in the underlying science about their effects. This is a review of systematic reviews.

This study used MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO and Epistemonikos from 2011 up to February 2017 for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials in adult patients with acute-phase MDD.We dually reviewed abstracts and full-text articles, rated the risk of bias of eligible systematic reviews and graded the strength of evidence.

Nineteen systematic reviews provided data on 28 comparisons of interest. For general efficacy, only second-generation antidepressants were supported with high strength evidence, presenting small beneficial treatment effects (standardised mean difference: -0.35; 95% CI -0.31 to -0.38), and a statistically significantly higher rate of discontinuation because of adverse events than patients on placebo (relative risk (RR) 1.88; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.28).

Only cognitive behavioural therapy is supported by reliable evidence (moderate strength of evidence) to produce responses to treatment similar to those of second-generation antidepressants (45.5% vs 44.2%; RR 1.10; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.30).

All remaining comparisons of non-pharmacological treatments with second-generation antidepressants either led to inconclusive results or had substantial methodological shortcomings (low or insufficient strength of evidence).In contrast to pharmacological treatments, the majority of non-pharmacological interventions for treating patients with MDD are not evidence based.

For patients with strong preferences against pharmacological treatments, clinicians should focus on therapies that have been compared directly with antidepressants.

Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder: review of systematic reviews.
Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder: review of systematic reviews.

Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

BACKGROUND Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy has been rising in prevalence, due to increased awareness and advanced imaging. For the symptomatic patient, pharmacological management remains an effective approach to the majority of patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

However, a significant subset fails to improve sufficiently with medical therapy initially, or progressively becomes more symptomatic despite augmented medications over time.

Most of the advances in the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have therefore been made in the area of non-pharmacologic management, particularly septal reduction therapy. Both surgical myectomy and alcohol septal ablation have undergone iterative modifications that improve outcomes. Current guidelines support these therapies based on large observational studies, with choice of therapy based on a variety of factors but again based primarily on expert consensus opinion.

Areas covered: This article reviews both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to improve outflow tract obstruction and symptoms, and provides an algorithm for addressing the symptomatic obstructive patient. Expert commentary: Current options for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy allow the majority of patients to live their lives with no more than NYHA Class 2 heart failure symptoms.

Treatment algorithms can add in identification of patients who may benefit from advanced therapies, and should be instituted routinely to improve care for the majority of patients with symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

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